Avoid Common Front End Development Mistakes

Posted By Himanshu Khurana | 30-Apr-2018

While developing the interface, it is very important to understand users and their behavior to build a perfect interface, but there are some common coding errors that should be avoided. Here are some questions to consider when developing a website or application, and some hints and best practices that can help you keep your project going:

 


1. USE A TABLE INSTEAD OF A DIV CONTAINER

The table is the de facto way to place HTML elements several years ago. When starting a front-end design career, using them seems easier than using div and CSS containers. However, the tables can be quite complex and can lead to design flaws and misalignment in different browsers.

 

The design of the table has been replaced by more and more container CSS and divs as a more optimized way of placing elements and creating designs. Tables are still useful when displaying information graphics, but are rarely used to create designs. When designing the front-end HTML code, try selecting a "no-table" design.

 


2. CODING WITH OLD HTML ELEMENTS

HTML5 is the latest form of HTML coding language and offers many changes to the standard page layout. HTML5 replaces elements such as Adobe Flash with <canvas> tags. The new standard also rejected some of the CSS design labels, such as <frames> and <center>.


In general, it is best to avoid using the old HTML standard for encoding. The design of the front end depends to a large extent on browser support. Older HTML support is not always available in some browsers, and this is a bad practice and may leave your site at a disadvantage for a long time. (Not to mention, HTML5 has many incredible advantages, which will make the site more modern and secure.) The code may be difficult to support and, in some cases, may make your site more vulnerable to security attacks.

 


3. FORGETTING TO TEST FOR EACH MAJOR BROWSER

Front-end design relies heavily on JavaScript and client-side scripting. This is why best practices are the reason to test code in all major browsers. At least most people want you to try your code in Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer (now called Edge). You can determine which browsers you want to support by looking at your site’s navigation analysis data or using external sources to identify common browsers.

 

You must also determine the oldest browser version it will support. Many users use browsers that are the same age as their computers, so you should weigh the advantages and disadvantages that may alienate these users while maintaining the code for older browsers and older browsers. For the new one. Determine the oldest browser version you will support and then test in these previous versions.

 

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